Many of the lenders in our network stick with in-house debt collection practices rather than selling your debt to an outside collection agency, and they will never sue you or threaten criminal charges against you. Your lender may attempt to collect your debt via email, postal mail, telephone, or text message, and they may offer you a settlement so that you can repay your debt over time. All of our lenders are required to adhere to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act which protects you from harassment. You can contact your lender for more information about its specific policies.
Every state regulates payday loans differently. In some states, including Georgia, they are banned outright. In other states, interest rates are capped to such an extent that they are essentially banned. In total, 18 states ban payday loans. Other states, such as Oregon, have some restrictions in place, but payday lenders still operate in them. Payday loans come with few restrictions in 32 states. Any restrictions in these states tend to focus on the maximum number of loans someone can take out and not on rates.
A report from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York concluded that, "We ... test whether payday lending fits our definition of predatory. We find that in states with higher payday loan limits, less educated households and households with uncertain income are less likely to be denied credit, but are not more likely to miss a debt payment. Absent higher delinquency, the extra credit from payday lenders does not fit our definition of predatory."[24] The caveat to this is that with a term of under 30 days there are no payments, and the lender is more than willing to roll the loan over at the end of the period upon payment of another fee. The report goes on to note that payday loans are extremely expensive, and borrowers who take a payday loan are at a disadvantage in comparison to the lender, a reversal of the normal consumer lending information asymmetry, where the lender must underwrite the loan to assess creditworthiness.
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