Payday loans, sometimes referred to as cash advance loans, have received quite a bit of bad press, but when used properly, a pay day loan can have a definite upside. A short term financial bind can happen to a lot of people and being able to get a small loan quickly can save you money by avoiding costly late fees or overdraft charges. Sure, $50 is a steep price to pay for a $300 payday loan, but if it means you are able to get your rent check, house payment, or car payment in on time and avoid the hefty late fees and possible damage to your credit score, it is more than worth it.
Moneytree is a member of the Community Financial Services Association (CFSA), the Financial Service Centers of America (FiSCA), California Financial Service Providers Association (CFSP), and the Colorado Financial Services Centers Association (COFiSCA). Moneytree actively supports laws, regulations and industry best practices that protect consumers and preserve access to credit. As a member of the Community Financial Services Association of America (CFSA), our company encourages responsible industry practices and proudly supports and abides by CFSA’s Best Practices.

Payday loans are meant to be short-term, unsecured loans. They are based on a pre-set automatic withdrawal from your bank account or a check held by the loan company for future deposit on a specific date. Borrowers either write a check to the lender or promise to pay back the amount borrowed, plus interest and any fees. Some companies will allow in-store payday loan customers to repay in cash at the store, in exchange for their post-dated check.


Bill C28 supersedes the Criminal Code of Canada for the purpose of exempting Payday loan companies from the law, if the provinces passed legislation to govern payday loans.[56][57] Payday loans in Canada are governed by the individual provinces. All provinces, except Newfoundland and Labrador, have passed legislation. For example, in Ontario loans have a maximum rate of 14,299% Effective Annual Rate ("EAR")($21 per $100, over 2 weeks). As of 2017, major payday lenders have reduced the rate to $18 per $100, over 2 weeks.
Research for the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation found that a majority of Illinois payday loan borrowers earn $30,000 or less per year.[16] Texas' Office of the Consumer Credit Commissioner collected data on 2012 payday loan usage, and found that refinances accounted for $2.01 billion in loan volume, compared with $1.08 billion in initial loan volume. The report did not include information about annual indebtedness.[17] A letter to the editor from an industry expert argued that other studies have found that consumers fare better when payday loans are available to them.[18] Pew's reports have focused on how payday lending can be improved, but have not assessed whether consumers fare better with or without access to high-interest loans. Pew's demographic analysis was based on a random-digit-dialing (RDD) survey of 33,576 people, including 1,855 payday loan borrowers.[19]
Nobody likes being in debt, but it’s even worse when it seems like there’s no way out. Twelve million Americans turn to payday loans every year, spending $9 billion on loan fees, according to a recent report by the Pew Charitable Trusts, because few of these loans are paid off by their due date. In fact, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau notes more than 60% of borrowers end up trapped in payday loan debt, rolling over the loan so many times that they end up paying more in fees than their initial loan amount.
A medical emergency needs an immediate response. You can't hold off on treating a major problem, and your primary care physician may not be able to see you soon enough. Emergency room visits rack up bills from the hospital, the doctors and the specialists. If you have health insurance, the coinsurance or copayment for your stay may be a hard-to-handle amount. The best payday loans let you focus on getting well rather than your healthcare costs.
Nobody likes being in debt, but it’s even worse when it seems like there’s no way out. Twelve million Americans turn to payday loans every year, spending $9 billion on loan fees, according to a recent report by the Pew Charitable Trusts, because few of these loans are paid off by their due date. In fact, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau notes more than 60% of borrowers end up trapped in payday loan debt, rolling over the loan so many times that they end up paying more in fees than their initial loan amount. 

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